My Blog

Posts for: December, 2018

By Rocco Ciccone MS. DDS
December 25, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: cosmetic dentistry  
NewYearNewSmile

As December brings the old year to a close, it’s a great time to set goals for the year to come. This might include a major life change, such as a new job—or even a new romance! If one of these items is on your list for 2019, a smile makeover may be just the thing to help you get there.

Having a great smile can give your self-confidence a real boost. It can also affect how you are perceived by others. According to a survey by the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, 99.7% of adults believe a smile is an important social asset and 96% believe an attractive smile makes a person more appealing to members of the opposite sex. At the same time, three quarters of adults feel that an unattractive smile can hurt a person’s chances for career success.

If you aren’t pleased with your smile and want a new look, we can help you figure out which cosmetic dental treatments could be right for you. The answer might be something simple—like an overall brightening of the smile with professional teeth whitening, or fixing a small crack or chip in a single tooth with cosmetic tooth bonding. If you’re unhappy with worn-down or crooked teeth, dental veneers or orthodontic treatment might be the way to go. In fact, many adults find that orthodontic treatment with clear aligners is a great way to get a beautiful, straight smile without drawing attention to the fact that a makeover is in progress.

Of course, it’s not only important for your smile to look good but also for your whole mouth to stay healthy. So if you are experiencing any tooth pain, unusual mouth sores or gum problems, it’s time for you to come in for an exam. And if it’s been a while since you’ve had a dental checkup and professional teeth cleaning, why not make an appointment for early in the year? Don’t start the new year with last year’s dental problems!

If you would like more information about cosmetic dental treatments or preventive dentistry, please contact us or schedule a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “How Your Dentist Can Help You Look Younger” and “Dental Hygiene Visit.”


By Rocco Ciccone MS. DDS
December 15, 2018
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: oral hygiene  
WhatYouNeedtoKnowtoBuytheRightToothbrush

If there’s one essential tool for protecting your dental health, it’s the humble toothbrush. The basic manual brush with a long, slender handle and short-bristled head is still effective when used skillfully. The market, though, is full of choices, all of them touting their brand as the best.

So how do you choose? You can cut through any marketing hype with a few simple guidelines.

First, understand what you’re trying to accomplish with brushing: removing dental plaque, that thin film of bacteria and food particles on tooth surfaces that’s the main cause of dental disease. Brushing also stimulates gum tissue and helps reduce inflammation.

With that in mind, you’ll first want to consider the texture of a toothbrush’s bristles, whether they’re stiff (hard) or more pliable (soft). You might think the firmer the better for removing plaque, but actually a soft-bristled brush is just as effective in this regard. Stiffer bristles could also damage the gums over the long term.

Speaking of bristles, look for those that have rounded tips. In a 2016 study, less rounded tips increased gum recession in the study’s participants by 30%. You should also look for toothbrushes with different bristle heights: longer bristles at the end can be more effective cleaning back teeth.

As far as size and shape, choose a brush that seems right and comfortable for you when you hold it. For children or people with dexterity problems, a handle with a large grip area can make the toothbrush easier to hold and use.

And look for the American Dental Association (ADA) Seal of Acceptance, something you may have seen on some toothpaste brands. It means the toothbrush in question has undergone independent testing and meets the ADA’s standards for effectiveness. That doesn’t mean a particular brush without the seal is sub-standard—when in doubt ask your dentist on their recommendation.

Even a quality toothbrush is only as effective as your skill in using it. Your dental provider can help, giving you tips and training for getting the most out of your brush. With practice, you and your toothbrush can effectively remove disease-causing plaque and help keep your smile beautiful and healthy.

If you would like more information on what to look for in a toothbrush, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Sizing up Toothbrushes.”


PracticeDailyOralHygienetoPreventCalcifiedPlaqueFormation

If you’ve ever heard your dentist or hygienist talk about “calculus,” they’re not referring to a higher branch of mathematics. The calculus on your teeth is something altogether different.

Calculus, also called tartar, is dental plaque that’s become hardened or “calcified” on tooth surfaces. Plaque begins as soft food particles and bacteria that accumulate on the teeth, and more so if you don’t properly clean your teeth every day. This built-up plaque becomes both home and food source for bacteria that can cause tooth decay or periodontal (gum) disease.

Because of this direct link between plaque and/or calculus and dental disease, we encourage everyone to perform two important oral hygiene tasks every day. The first is to floss between your teeth to remove plaque as you are unable to effectively reach those areas with a toothbrush.  Once you loosen all the plaque, the other really important task is a thorough brushing of all of the tooth surfaces to remove any plaque that may have accumulated since the last brushing. Doing so every day will catch most of the softer plaque before it becomes calcified.

Once it forms, calculus is impossible to remove by brushing and flossing alone. That’s why you should have regular cleanings performed by a dental professional. Dentists and hygienists have special tools called scalers that allow them to manually remove plaque and calculus, as well as ultrasonic equipment that can vibrate it loose to be flushed away with water.

In fact, you should undergo dental cleanings at least twice a year (or as often as your dentist recommends) even if you religiously brush and floss daily. Calculus forms so easily that it’s nearly inevitable you’ll accumulate some even if you have an effective hygiene regimen. Your dental team can remove hardened deposits of calculus that may have gotten past your own hygiene efforts.

If you haven’t been consistently practicing this kind of daily hygiene, see your dentist to get a fresh start. Not only will they be able to check for any emerging problems, they can clean your teeth of any plaque and calculus buildup so that you’ll be able to start with a “clean” slate.

Calculus can be tenacious, but it not impossible to remove. Don’t let it set you up for an unhealthy experience with your teeth and gums.

If you would like more information on reducing plaque buildup, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.